Ballet

Ballet – Both classical and contemporary ballet styles are used to develop technique, balance, and control.  Ballet students who enroll in the Recreational Dance Session will learn a routine to be performed at the Annual One Step Above Dance Recital.

 

Classical ballet is the most methodical of the ballet styles; it adheres to traditional ballet technique. There are variations relating to area of origin, such as French ballet, Danish Bournonville ballet, Italian ballet and Russian ballet, although most ballet of the last two centuries is ultimately founded on the teachings of Carlo Blasis. The most well-known styles of ballet are the Paris Opera Ballet School Method, the Russian Method, the Italian Method, the Danish Method, the Balanchine Method or New York City Ballet Method, and the Royal Academy of Dance and Royal Ballet School Methods, derived from the Cecchetti method, created in England. The first pointe shoes were actually regular ballet slippers that were heavily darned at the tip. It would allow the girl to briefly stand on her toes to appear weightless. It was later converted to the hard box that is used today.

Classical ballet adheres to these rules:

  • A position called 'plie' is used in almost every exercise
  • Everything is turned out.
  • When the feet are not on the floor, they're pointed.
  • When the leg is not bent, it's stretched completely.
  • Posture, alignment, and placement are vital.

Neoclassical Ballet is a ballet style that uses traditional ballet vocabulary but is less rigid than the classical ballet. For example, dancers often dance at more extreme tempos and perform more technical feats. Spacing in neoclassical ballet is usually more modern or complex than in classical ballet. Although organization in neoclassical ballet is more varied, the focus on structure is a defining characteristic of neoclassical ballet.

Contemporary ballet is a form of dance influenced by both classical ballet and modern dance. It takes its technique and body control using abdominal strength from classical ballet, although it permits a greater range of movement that may not adhere to the strict body lines or turnout set forth by schools of ballet technique. Many of its concepts come from the ideas and innovations of 20th century modern dance, including floor work and turn-in of the legs. This style is generally danced barefoot.
 

 

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Dance Types

Jazz, Jazz Floorwork/Technique, Ballet, Ballet Barre, Tap, Tap Floorwork, Hip-Hop, Clogging, Combo I & Combo II, Acro-Dance, Cheerleading Prep, Pom Pon, Tumbling

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PHONE: (812) 339-5365
ADDRESS:
4075 W Gifford Rd
Bloomington, IN 47403